Holy Cross Catholic Church offers a process for those who wish to become full members of our Catholic community. This process is called the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults * (RCIA)

a full description of RCIA can be found on this link to the U.S. Catholic Conference of Bishops website.

 

Video of Rite of Welcome at Holy Cross-November 4, 2017

CALLED BY NAME ....RCIA Candidates

 At the Saturday Vigil Mass on Nov. 4th, 2017 ......those who, weeks ago,  accepted

the invitation to journey spiritually with the family of Holy Cross in the RCIA (Rite of Christian
Initiation of Adults) participated in the Rite of Welcome, which is the first public statement
of intent to be received fully into the Catholic Church.   (This is different from the Rite of
Acceptance which is for those who have not been baptized.) 
Following the Rite of Welcome, these faithful seekers of Christ, brought here to Holy Cross
by the work of the Holy Spirit, are now called candidates.

All of them have all been baptized:  in the Catholic faith or in a Protestant faith tradition.  
Some of them have received their First Holy Communion and receive the Eucharist.......others
will receive Holy Eucharist for the first time at the Easter Vigil, and all are journeying
through the weekly RCIA sessions to the sacrament of Confirmation.

During the Rite of Welcome, Father Mark asked them: "Are you prepared to reflect more deeply on the mystery of your baptism, to listen with us to the apostles' instruction, and to join with us in a life of prayer and service?" and they responded  "I am."

Their sponsors and the parishioners at this Mass were asked by Father Mark:
"Sponsors, you now present these candidates to us.  Are you, and all who are gathered
with us, ready to help these candidates complete their Christian initiation?" and the
response was "We are". Beyond the Nov. 4th,  Saturday Vigil Mass, we ask all of our Holy Cross family, attending all Masses to join with us in a commitment to them.....to support them in our lives of prayer and service, to be companions to them as they journey to fully become one with us in the Body of Christ.

 A photograph taken at the Rite of Welcome is in the vestibule so that you may recognize them and encourage them at Masses.  They are a sign of the strength and power of the invitation of Christ Jesus to "come and see" where He
lives and to live out the greatest commandment St. Matthew 22:37-39. 

It is not too late! Please contact us at 503-289-2834 or angelapaz@archdpdx.org

 

Upcoming Sessions are Saturdays ...right after the 5-6pm Saturday Vigil Mass from 6:15 to 7:30 pm in the Parish Office, Upper Room

 

Weekly Sessions
Nov. 4th 2017  The Rite of Welcome at Saturday Vigil Mass - Church teaching authority 
Nov. 11th, 2017  The Lectionary, the Liturgical Year with Lorie Simmons 
Nov. 18th, 2017  Thanksgiving, Christ the King, Advent is coming 
Dec. 2nd, 2017  First Sunday of Advent 

 

Resources used for RCIA sessions include:

Prayer Aids online:

Daily readings of the Mass   

Come Pray the Rosary  

Stations of the Cross      

Sacred Space (Irish Jesuits and Loyola Press)  

Pray As You Go

BEST CATHOLIC BOOKS LIST

  • Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • The Imitation of Christ   Thomas a Kempis
  • The Confessions of St. Augustine   Augustine of Hippo
  • The Seven Storey Mountain Thomas Merton
  • Dark Night of the Soul   St. John of the Cross
  • Crossing the Threshold of Hope   St. John Paul II
  • Interior Castle   St. Teresa of Avila
  • St. Thomas Aquinas: The Dumb Ox   G.K. Chesterton
  • The Long Loneliness   Dorothy Day
  • The Holy Longing, Fr. Ronald Rolheiser
  • The Return of the Prodigal Son, Fr. Henri Nouwen
  • The Wounded Healer, Fr. Henri Nouwen
  • Edith Stein: Essential Writings
  •  

ALL ABOUT SAINTS:   

Fr. James Martin, SJ My Life with The Saints 
Robert Ellsberg All Saints 
Robert Ellsberg  The Saints' Guide to Happiness
Robert Ellsberg  Bkessed Among All Women 
Lisa Hendley A Book of Saints for Catholic Moms

 

99 Creative Ways to Share Your Faith . . .

Receive the Gospel of Christ, whose herald you have become.  Believe what you read, teach what you believe, and practice what you teach.

1)      Be proud (in the good sense) of being a Catholic. Live your life with holy boldness.

2)      Focus on what is truly important. Relationships are what’s important. Christian values are important.

3)      Set time apart daily for God. Don’t be afraid to tell others you do that.

4)      Smile a lot.  It makes you happy. It also makes others happy.  It’s a great witness to your Christian joy.  Smiling is a one word Christian philosophy on living.   

5)      Make Mass a habit; try to work daily Mass into your life as frequently as you can.

6)      Say “Thank you” as often as you can.  Expressing gratitude makes you more appreciative of what you have. Gratitude is a beautiful virtue.   It helps make you, and those you thank, happy! 

7)      Choose to be a disciple of Jesus Christ; not simply a volunteer: pray, fast, give alms.  Do works of service.  Gently share your faith and explain how it brings you happiness. 

8)      Try always to do things in love.  Let the love you choose be “agape love”… that is, love for the sake of the other.

9)      Keep Sunday’s holy.  Try not to spend money or engage in competitive organized sports on the Sabbath.  Try not to do things that require others to work on Sunday. 

10)  Forgive others, sincerely. 

11)  Be hospitable.  Invite, welcome, and engage others as a Catholic lifestyle.

12)  Mention your faith in public.  Don’t be afraid to tell your story.  Your life is your experience of faith. Recognize where God has “broken in”. Tell others.  Feel free to speculate on a recent “God moment”.

13)  Say “thank God”, “I believe”, or “Amen” in public.

14)  Go to confession regularly.  Once a month is a good “rule of thumb”.  Make this a family practice, too.

15)  Be bold enough to say, “That is against my faith”, or “my faith teaches….”

16)  Make it a regular habit to visit Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament.

17)  Invite somebody to church.  This is especially effective during Advent, Christmas, Ash Wednesday, Lent, Easter, and Pentecost.

18)  Fast regularly.  Even small fasts teach spiritual discipline. 

19)  Wear a crucifix or scapular.  Say a brief prayer before you put it.

20)  Recognize that special moments in life – the birth of a child, baptism, a marriage, the reception of a sacrament, a death, a funeral – are all privileged moments for evangelization.  People share in these events, and are moved by them, even if they do not participate in “a faith walk” or “church” regularly.

21)  Make a brief “morning offering” to God when you awake. 

22)  Visit family and friends regularly.

23)  Recognize that modern technologies are changing the way we interact with each other.  Heart-to-heart and face-to-face conversations are still the best way to communicate.  This also holds true in communicating the faith.

24)  Pray for the souls in Purgatory, particularly deceased loved ones. 

25)  Participate in a Catholic or ecumenical Bible study or faith sharing group.

26)  If someone has a misguided belief as to what the Church teaches, clear it up for him/her.

27)  Tithe.  It helps you set good spiritual and material priorities and makes you more grateful to God.

28)  Care for your aged relatives as best you can…and for other aged people.

29)  Subscribe to the Diocese of Salina Register.  It keeps you linked to the local church.

30)  Read other Catholic literature regularly.  Bring it up in conversation.

31)  Start, or be part of a hospitality committee in your parish.  Contact the Office of the New Evangelization for a “Hospitality Ideas Manual.”

32)  Dress appropriately, and with dignity.  As a Christian, you represent Christ, not the culture.

33)  Walk with people in their sufferings.

34)  Use a window/bumper sticker to promote the faith.

35)  Get an “In God we Trust” state of Kansas license plate.

36)  Stand against moral degeneration in our nation.

37)  Call evil by name.  “Be not afraid” is mentioned 153 times in the Bible in one expression or another. It is the most mentioned phrase in the Bible.

38)  Make time for others. Be accessible to them.

39)  Send cards to the sick and bereaved.

40)  Say less.  Think before you make a quip. Does it glorify God?

41)  Wear a good Catholic/ Christian T-shirt.

42)  Take someone to see a movie or rent a video or participate in cultural or artistic activities that have healthy spiritual overtones.

43)  Be friendly.

44)  Be truthful.

45)  Take time to play.  Invite others.

46)  Say grace before meals…making the Sign of the Cross wherever you are.

47)  Display religious items in your home, office, or vehicle.

48)  Stop gossiping.

49)  Run an event or sports program out of the church for the community.

50)  Help your parish do a periodic youth all-nighter. 

51)  Pray the Rosary…and sometimes on a park bench.  Pray it slowly, putting yourself there at the mystery and decade you are reciting.

52)  Visit someone who is lonely.

53)  Join the Knights, Daughters of Isabella, Catholic Daughters, Legion of Mary, Serrans, etc.

54)  Take a white river rafting trip with Catholic youth/families.

55)  Go fishing with Christian friends.

56)  Invite people to your home for meals.  Breaking bread together is important. 

57)  Have a BBQ, with family and friends, include some Christian conversation.

58)  Buy religious items as presents for birthday, Christmas, anniversary, etc.

59)  Read some Scripture daily; memorize & use some verses you particularly like.

60)  Read Catholic books and magazines, listen to Catholic tapes. Discuss them with friends both Catholic and non-Catholic. Keep the discussion gentle, respectful, and passionate.

61)  Volunteer at a soup kitchen, city jail, or prison.

62)  Do a retreat.  See ideas for various retreats below. 

63)  Be a scout leader.  Make sure the right values are being suggested.

64)  Place religious statuary in your yard.

65)  Man a booth promoting Catholicism, life, or Christian values at a fair.

66)  Use K of C “Keep Christ in Christmas” window magnets or stickers.

67)  Use Divine Mercy stickers or signs on your car or outside your home.

68)  Assist the Diocese Office of the New Evangelization or the parish with Catholic radio spots.  Usually, a not-for-profit gets a discount and we can make certain the message is conveyed the way the Church would like it conveyed.  

69)  The same with #68 but can be done with newspapers, magazines, cable, or TV spots.

70)  Respectfully challenge an atheist.  Ask what the purpose of his/her life is?  Ask him/her how he can know his/her values have any merit outside himself?  Explain how knowing, loving, and serving God in this life and being happy with Him forever in eternity is your purpose in life.   

71)  Laugh a lot.  Share good, wholesome, jokes…and religious jokes.

72)  Seek spiritual direction.  Give spiritual direction as a friend….always promote what the Church promotes. We all need an objective shoulder to lean on.

73)  Support and promote pro-life agencies and organizations.

74)  Support charities with wholesome values.  Don’t support charities that do 95% good things and 5% bad. Explain why…that there are organizations that you agree with 100% and you prefer to support them.

75)  Encourage young men and women not to live together.   Be confident in stating that true love really does wait.

76)  Encourage young couples to learn “theology of the body” and discourage them from using artificial means of birth control and engaging in pre-martial sex. The arguments are compelling from a physical health perspective, a Christian spirituality standpoint, and in encouraging true love.

77)  Go to adult education talks in your parish.  Invite co-workers, family, and friends to go with you.  For ideas, speak to your pastor.  The Office of the New Evangelization also has a “Speakers List” and a “PowerPoint Talks List”.  

78)  Help the parish sponsor a Catholic billboard.  Or work together with friends to support one through the diocese. 

79)  Have a Friday (or Saturday) Night at the Movies in your parish.  Bring potluck snacks. Choose a movie with Christian themes or imagery, discuss the imagery afterwards.    The Chronicles of Narnia series are a good place to start.  They are also good for young families.  The Lord of the Rings trilogy is great for young adults and older.

80)  Have witness nights at your parish. Share several conversion stories. Combine it with a potluck.

81)  Read a book -- over a period of days/weeks -- to a senior or a child.

82)  Be a Eucharistic Minister to the homebound.

83)  Adopt a grandparent as a family.  Invite them to your home for holidays, or visit them during the holidays.  (Often seniors are more comfortable in their own homes).

84)  Take your kids, or grandkids, to the playground. Converse with others while you are there.

85)  Participate in the Annual Life Chain event; help at a pregnancy counseling center; or support Rachel’s Vineyard post-abortion healing retreat.

86)  Reduce your intake of television, movies, and the internet.

87)  Spend some time in silent reflection. Start with five minutes a day.  Try to visualize darkness, calmness, nothingness, peace.  Block out other thoughts.  God will “break-in” when He wants.  You will recognize him. 

88)  Spend some time with nature.  Thank God for his creation and His incredible creativity.

89)  When an inappropriate thought crosses your mind, turn it around into something for which you can praise God’; then, do so.

90)  Tell God you love Him regularly and spontaneously. 

91)  Tell others you love them, too.  As St. Francis taught, “use words when necessary”.

92)  Apologize when you make a mistake or hurt someone.

93)  Stop by the neighbors occasionally. Bring a dessert.

94)  Make Halloween a religious event again.  Mock the evil spirits of our age.  They have no power over the Christian who is in Christ.  Celebrate this event.

95)  Read about the saints.  Tell their stories.

96)  Talk to your guardian angel regularly.  Ask him to send a cohort of angels and saints to be with you and others you want to help or protect.

97)  Get a group of people to go out together singing Christmas carols.

98)  Do Christmas “posada” processions.

99)  Those times when you fail God, others, or yourself, pick yourself up and move    The only way you can ultimately fail with God is to stop trying.

 

http://salinadiocese.org/new-evangelization/1955-99-effective-ways-to-evangelize-as-a-catholic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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